Wendy Taylor

President’s Message

Years ago, I was told by a very well-known winemaker that the best wine is the wine one likes best, whether it be a $150 bottle of Napa Cab or a bottle of Two Buck Chuck. However, as the years have gone on and there are more days behind me than ahead, I beg to now differ with him, as I’ve learned that the best wines are those shared with friends and loved ones. This is clearly evidenced at all OCWS gatherings throughout the year. The laughter and love that abounds within the group is palpable. This organization brings people together, initially, by their love of wine and thirst for wine knowledge but has the magic touch of creating family circles where otherwise there may not have been. Circles of friends, whose paths wouldn’t have crossed in life, through the OCWS become those “families” that share life all year long within and outside of the organization. For me this is high on my list of the best holiday gifts I’ve ever received and just simply hope for more of these gifts of the heart, gifts of friendship, and gifts of being surrounded by amazingly loving people.

During this holiday season, whether you trim a Christmas tree, light a Menorah or a Kinara, go to church, synagogue, or a mosque, or not, may you all be blessed with the gifts of the heart and be surrounded by loved ones, whether they be family or families of friends. May you have many blessings to count and share the wines you love with others.

Wishing you all a wonderful holiday season and a New Year filled with laughter and love.

Cheers and L’Chaim!

– Fran Gitsham, President

OCWS Photography Contest

The OCWS has started a photography contest and you are invited to participate! As you might have guessed, the subject is “Wine,” but this can mean many things to many people. Do you have a great shot of the sun filtering through the vines just before picking? Or an action shot of wine being poured with some great swirls in the glass? Or a romantic shot of a couple toasting each other with some wine? These are just a couple ideas, and I am sure you have many more ideas of that great shot involving wine in some way.

Each month the Photography Committee will select a “Photo of the Month” for publication in an upcoming Wine Press as well as on the OCWS website. The ultimate goal is to publish an OCWS Calendar, consisting of the 12 best photos of the year. These may or may not be the 12 monthly winners.

The rules are simple:

  1. Entrants must be OCWS members in good standing and the submitted photo must have been photographed by the OCWS member when he/she was an active member.
  2. The photo must be somehow wine oriented. It may be of a winery, a vineyard, the winemaking process, the finished product or simply the consumption. But don’t limit yourself to these ideas!
  3. The photo may be submitted to the photography committee anytime but will be considered only for the month it was submitted. There is a limit of five (5) submissions per month.
  4. Upon submission, rights of the photo are given to the OCWS for marketing purposes, so before you submit it make sure it is your property. Please get permission from any people in the photo to use for OCWS marketing purposes .
  5. The photo may be submitted in any either JPEG, RAW, TIFF, or Photoshop format. Any size is acceptable, but is preferred to be at least 3000×2400 pixels, which is an 8×10 shot at 300 dpi for printing.

To submit a picture attach it in an email to Jim@JBurk.net. Be sure to include your name, phone number, picture location and picture title.

If you have any questions contact Jim Burk at Jim@JBurk.net, OCWS photographer and head of the OCWS photography committee.

– Jim Burk, OCWS Photographer

2023 OCWS Winery Program: Double Gold Award-Winning Wineries

The 2023 Winery Program starts in January with “Double Gold” winning wineries and continues monthly through April. We have invited prestigious wineries who have won this coveted Award in the 2022 Commercial Wine Competition. This Annual Series promotes the knowledge of winemaking, viticulture, and wine appreciation.

 

This program introduces our members to different wines made from the best wine producing regions in California. Save the Friday dates below and mark your calendars to attend. Look for information about each tasting in The Wine Press, and sign-up on the OCWS website.

We invite the winemakers to come and talk about their wines and to answer your questions. This is a great benefit that we provide our members with the opportunity to meet the winemakers. If you consider, that if you visit a winery, how often are you able to hear and talk personally with the winemakers themselves? You can do that by participating in this program.

Having these award-winning wineries, gives our members the chance to taste their wines and learn if you enjoy a particular style. At the end of the evening, you may order the wines, usually at a discounted price. The wines will then be shipped directly to your home.

We will hold our Winery Program on Friday evenings at the Avenue of the Arts Hotel in Costa Mesa. Each tasting starts with a light dinner. You may select either the dinner buffet, or a plated “sit-down” dinner with this meal served to you at your table. With our large membership and limited attendance space, we encourage you to sign up early. Self-parking is included in the price.

– Rich Skoczylas, Winery Program Coordinator

Wines of Alba, Italy—Close to Home!

we love to travel. This past October, less than five months after our quasi-world cruise, we were at it again, this time back in Northwestern Italy where Manuela was born – in the region known as Piemonte, or Piedmont for the English speakers. And, of course, our travels would not be complete without a trip to a few wineries.

About an hour and a half south of Ivrea, now our second home, and south of Turin, are two cities – Alba and Asti. Surrounding Alba are the two well-known Italian AVAs, Barolo and Barbaresco. We stayed near Alba to see the sights but also to visit three outstanding wineries that produce wines from these AVAs.

Some more background for you. Italy has some very specific rules and standards that are set for its AVAs that assures both quality and distinct characteristics to be found in the specific AVA. You know them as DOC and DOCG. I will spare you from the Italian, but the later – DOCG – implies the highest quality and distinction. And in all of Italy, Piemonte has the greatest number of DOCs, 37, and DOCGs, 18, than any other Italian region, more than the famous Tuscan region. I will get into this more as I talk about the three wineries, but one example of the regional requirements is that there can only be natural irrigation of the vines, regardless of the climate and weather. The three wineries that we visited, adhere to that requirement, producing Barolo and Barbaresco DOC and DOCG wines.

Something else I want to share with you that is no small achievement. All three of the wineries that we visited were not just fourth- or fifth-generation family-owned establishments, they were all owned and managed by the women of the families. And well managed they were.  So, let’s get to the specifics.

Pio Cesare

After learning about Pio Cesare from a network channel called V is for Vino – something else that I found and recommend to OCWS – we knew we had to come find out for ourselves. Pio Cesare was started in 1881 within the city of Alba, just twenty years after the formation of country that we currently know as Italy. Five generations later it is one of the most historical and well-known wineries in Italy and elsewhere, producing 450,000 bottles mainly of Barolo, Barbaresco, Barbera, Dolcetto and Chardonnay.

Our host for the two-hour tour and tasting was Davide. And as is the practice of Pio Cesare, he devoted the entire time just to Manuela and me. Davide began with a bit of the history of both the family and the home that became the cellar and winery. It is still the home of the current family to this day.  The cellars, comprising four levels, are constrained by ancient Roman walls dating back to 50 B.C. Over the decades, expansion of the facility included going under the adjacent Tanaro river. The cellars were abound with massive French and Slavonian (similar to Hungarian) oak barrels. Our guide pointed out two distinctive highlights to be found in the cellars. One was the century-old single bottle “elevator” that brought filled bottles to the top level and empty bottles back down. Another highlight was to see at some three levels belowground an original vine still growing after more than one hundred years. Davide also pointed out that there are bottled wines still in the racks dating back to at least 1916 and that the labels had not changed significantly in over the past one hundred years.

The current managing family member is Federica Boffa, only 25 years old. She does have other family members to support her. As for the vineyards, which are distinct throughout Barolo and Barbaresco, Pio Cesare owns many. Davide told us that all grapes are grown on estates contained within the family-owned 170 acres and within the Barolo or Barbaresco AVAs.

The tour was phenomenal, but then we came to the best part – the tasting. We were seated at the table that the family still uses for its holiday gatherings. Davide brought out four reds and, surprisingly, a Chardonnay. Apparently, back when fourth generation owner, Mr. Pio Boffa, was visiting California, he became enthralled with Chardonnay. He thought that if France and California can grow it, so could he, despite local assertion that it would never thrive. Pio Boffa was one of the great pioneers of Chardonnay planted and produced in Italy in the early 1980’s. I can tell you that after tasting the 2020 Piodilei Chardonnay, he exceeded all expectations. After a taste and some more explanation by Davide, he had me set my glass of Chard aside while we went on to the reds.

And, of course, each of the reds had some history behind them.

The first that I tried was a 2021 Grignolino. I had only learned of this varietal just a few days before while in Ivrea – Manuela’s home town – and was quite pleased. The Grignolino presented by Davide was fantastic, something between a Malbec and a Pinot Noir, in my opinion.

The remaining three reds were the commonly known ones of the region, the first being a 2020 Fides Barbera d’Alba. Wonderful! It should age a bit longer, but was still ready to drink now. Typical of Barbera, it was medium bodied, but like a Pinot, it would be great with white meats, fish and pasta.

This was followed by two Nebbiolos, a 2019 Barbaresco, and a 2018 Barolo. Both were outstanding but needed to age a few more years to reach their peak. In fact, Davide told me that only the family had previously tried the 2019 Barbaresco since bottling. I was the first outside the family – what an honor! It was still young though. Two to four years from now, it will be phenomenal.

Wrapping up the tasting, we went back to the Chardonnay, now that it had been open for a while. You could definitely discern a subtle difference. And after the full-bodied reds, it held its own, while expressing some of the characteristics of the Nebbiolos! Excellent.

As we were saying good-byes, Davide informed me that the wines are not sold on the premises. Thus, you are not pressured to buy after your tour. He also said that Pio Cesare was undisputedly, the best winery in all of Alba… it’s the only winery within the city. A mere technicality!

Marrone

The next day we traveled south toward the Barolo region to a town called La Morra. There we encountered a winery facility, primarily the aging cellar, on top of the hillside, outside of town. The winery is called Agricola Gian Piero Marrone, or simply, Marrone. We were met by Nina Schurer, who was our tour guide and hostess. Nina is originally from the Netherlands, but had moved to the region with her family only a few years earlier. Needless to say, she was fluent in several languages.

Gian Piero Marrone, a third-generation owner and operator of the winery, has turned operations over to his three daughters, Denise, Serena and Valentina, making it now four generations of winemakers. The current winemaker is Valentina, the youngest of the three Marrone sisters, but still with the helping hand from her dad Gian Pierro Marrone. The three sisters are already the 4th generation in this family making wine, each of them with her own task. Be it sales and marketing, administration or process management. The three of them together are well equipped to lead this family business further into the future.

If Pio Cesare could be considered a large operation, Marrone was on the medium size. Yet, it was by far, a more diverse producer of wine. The family owns vineyards both within the Barolo and Barbaresco AVAs, as well as outside in the nearby region of Madonna di Como. At least twenty different lines (for lack of a better word) of wine were bottled by Marrone. Varietals included Nebbiolo, Barbera, Dolcetto, Arneis, Chardonnay and Moscato could be found here, but to retain their DOC or DOCG status from one of the regions, such as Barolo, then they could only produce the wine of the varietal from that region. Barolo and Barbaresco wines are 100% of the Nebbiolo varietal, but come from the two distinct regions with different terroir and different production requirements.

We received an informative and impressive tour of Marrone’s aging cellar. It appeared to be substantially underground, maintaining a constant temperature. The facility was very impressive, as you would expect, containing the numerous oak barrels or “bottes.”

At one point though, Nina pointed out something we had never seen before. For some of the varietals, part of the aging process is carried out with the lees (or inactive yeast material) still in the barrel. But what Marrone does that is different is that the barrels are stacked on rollers. Then, for as long as the wine is in the cellar, which varies from six to eighteen months, the barrels are hand cranked to rotate and, thus, stir up the lees. The churning process, known as battonage, takes place two to three times a week. This enhances the exposure of the lees to the wine and allows for more extraction of the elements that Marrone’s winemaker wants as part of his final product. The photo shows some of the barrels on rollers.

At the end of the tour, Nina took us to their aboveground tasting room. More like a veranda, it had an incredible view of the region. And we had ideal weather for it too.

I was able to choose from a number of wines for my tasting. Naturally, I went for what the region is famous for, starting with a 2019 Barbera d’Alba Superiore. If you know Barberas, this was right there – lighter than the Nebbiolo, very fruity but surprisingly purplish in color. And also surprisingly, it was 14.5% ABV. My tasting notes say I must find this one in the California markets.

Next up was a 2019 Nebbiolo d’Alba Superiore. Not a Barolo or Barbaresco, but still in the neighborhood. Nina told me that this wine spent six months in small botte, one year in large botte and one year in the bottles before being served. It was excellent. And side note: For those of you that know that I make Nebbiolo at home, this Marrone Nebbiolo was exactly why I do!

But perhaps the best was saved for last, I tasted the 2018 Pichemej, a Barolo DOCG. It was bold and flavorful, as I would expect from a Barolo, but clearly at the top of the class.  OK, the sad part is, I was so into this wine, I failed to write down my notes, but I remember it well and that isn’t that what drinking great wine is all about!

Azienda Agricola Pietro Rinaldi

Heading back toward Alba, we stopped at Azienda Agricola Petro Rinaldi. We selected this winery based on the very positive recommendation of one of my close Italian friends. Once again, we hit the jackpot. Like so many in the area, the Pietro Rinaldi winery is located high up on a hill. And like the two I had visited previously, this was another four-generation family-owned winery dating back to 1920, currently owned and operated by Monica Rinaldi.

Smallest of the three I visited, Pietro Rinaldi was every bit as charming as the other two. And, of course, all grapes for their wines are estate grown and were DOC or DOCG (only their Rosato was not). Pietro Rinaldi’s production included Barolos, Barbarescos, Barbera d’Albas, Dolcetto, and Langhe Arneis.

Our host, Ombretta, told us of the history and production of the wines, but quickly set us down for the tasting.

Ombretta presented me with five wines for tasting – shown in the adjacent photo.

We started off with a 2021 Rosato. This rose wine was 13½% ABV, so you know it was dry. Our host told me that it was macerated for two hours and that this was only the third vintage of this wine. It was dry and a bit bitter but could still be aged for three more years. Clearly this was intended for pairing with summer meals.

On to the reds…  First up was a 2020 Barbera d’Alba. Fermented to 14% ABV, and aged in steel tanks, it was medium bodied, dry, fruity and quite pleasant. This is a summertime wine. Ombretta said it did not require further aging. This was followed by a 2018 Barbera d’Alba Superiore. This Barbera was aged one year in steel tanks followed by one year in oak. Barbera is not known to be tannic, but this one was very mild in oak tannins when I tasted it. Definitely a notch above the prior Barbera and it can be enjoyed year round. Definitely a good wine to have around.

My fourth tasting was a 2020 Langhe Nebbiolo. Nebbiolo is, by far, the predominate varietal of this part of Italy. Langhe is another broader name for the AVA region. This particular wine was a blend of Barolo and Barbaresco, taking the best and distinctive differences of these AVAs – and, thus, the name Langhe. It had been aged in oak for one year. Our host said this would age well for up to ten years. Since I make Nebbiolo, I am always a fan. I found this wine to be light for a Nebbiolo, but would be very good with most foods year round.

For my final tasting, I was offered a newly released 2018 Barbaresco – sound familiar – that was excellent. It had a strong fruity aroma. It was a single-vineyard source, which is referred to as an MGA.  MGAs, or menzioni geografiche aggiuntive (there will be a test on this later), are specifically delineated place-names, that is, vineyards, within Barolo and Barbaresco that have been codified since 2010.

All were excellent wines. I bought two – one was the 2018 Barbaresco (new release) – to hold for a few years. But unless you plan to visit us in Italy, I won’t be able to share them with you.

In conclusion, I can say my trip to this region was outstanding. It was not our first time, and certainly won’t be our last. And, as they will be receiving copies of this article, I wish to take this moment to thank our three wonderful hosts. They each added to the experience. If you make it to this part of Italy, please seek them out!

– W. Scott Harral, Contributing Writer

President’s Message

Thankful for Paths Otherwise Gone
Uncrossed

With the holidays fast approaching beginning with Thanksgiving this month, among my thoughts is just how grateful I am to be a part of the Orange County Wine Society. I am so blessed to cross paths with so many people that otherwise I would never have met. I have had the honor of knowing some of the founding members of the OCWS and to have been touched by their hearts and to know just how precious a gift their passions and foresight have given us to this day.

The ultimate gift of this organization was conceived by a small group of people who, for their love of wine, created the Wine Society. Beginning in 1976, a group of about sixteen like-minded people would meet the first Friday of each month in the back room of Brant’s Wine Rack, a wine and beer supply store on Tustin Avenue in Orange, where the owner advised the group on winemaking. Soon friends wanted to sample the wines and the wine drinkers began to outnumber the winemakers. It was then that Brant Horton suggested getting a booth at the OC Fair and offered his business as a sponsor. Horton proposed wine competitions to the OC Fair and, from there, the OC Fair Home Wine and Commercial Wine Competitions were born. At that time, the run of the fair was a grand total one week, finding the Home Wine Competition with forty-nine entries and the Commercial Wine Competition having a whopping three varietals to be judged. Certainly, a far cry from over 600 entries to the 2022 Home Wine Competition and over 2,500 entries in the 2022 Commercial Wine Competition.

With interest being generated from the OC Fair exposure, the original tasting group formed the Orange County Wine Society in late 1977 and was incorporated as a non-profit educational organization in 1978. We have called the OC Fairgrounds home since 1980.

Who could have imagined that what was started by a small band of wine lovers would evolve into a 1,000-member strong group today, having granted over $740,000 to date in college scholarships? I thank those that came first for gifting us with their visions and commitments to their passions.

Wishing you a Thanksgiving with many blessings for which to be grateful and for the gift of passions that make your hearts happy.

Cheers!

– Fran Gitsham, President

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OCWS Photography Contest

The OCWS is starting a photography contest and you are invited to participate! As you might have guessed, the subject is “Wine,” but this can mean many things to many people. Do you have a great shot of the sun filtering through the vines just before picking? Or an action shot of wine being poured with some great swirls in the glass? Or a romantic shot of a couple toasting each other with some wine? These are just a couple ideas, and I am sure you have many more ideas of that great shot involving wine in some way.

Each month the Photography Committee will select a “Photo of the Month” for publication in an upcoming Wine Press. The ultimate goal is to publish an OCWS Calendar, consisting of the 12 best photos of the year. These may or may not be the 12 monthly winners.

The rules are simple:

  1. Entrants must be OCWS members in good standing and the submitted photo must have been photographed by the OCWS member when he/she was an active member.
  2. The photo must be somehow wine oriented. It may be of a winery, a vineyard, the winemaking process, the finished product or simply the consumption. But don’t limit yourself to these ideas!
  3. The photo may be submitted to the photography committee anytime but will be considered only for the month it was submitted. There is a limit of five (5) submissions per month.
  4. Upon submission, the photo becomes the property of the OCWS, so before you submit it make sure it is your property. Please get permission from any people in the photo to use for OCWS marketing purposes.
  5. The photo may be submitted in any either JPEG, RAW, TIFF, or Photoshop format. Any size is acceptable, but is preferred to be at least 3000×2400 pixels, which is an 8×10 shot at 300 dpi for printing.

To submit a picture attach it in an email to Jim@JBurk.net. Be sure to include your name, phone number, picture location and picture title.

If you have any questions contact Jim Burk at Jim@JBurk.net, OCWS photographer and head of the OCWS photography committee.

– Jim Burk, OCWS Photographer

President’s Message

With a New Year Comes New Challenges . . .

Any number of articles have been written over the years about the OCWS and the fact that we, amazingly, run on volunteerism. With the exception of office staff, accounting and website administration, every integral position within the organization is managed by volunteers. With a new Board year beginning, also comes new responsibilities for the ensuing year, and there are lots of them. Every year I have been on the Board, which is seven to date, your Board of Directors has discussed and discussed and discussed again how to go about encouraging more volunteers to take integral roles in the organization. The Board runs the business but, sadly, it still seems to fall upon their shoulders to chair major events as well.

It is not necessary to be a Director on the Board in order to help spearhead programs and, unless the next generation of volunteers start undertaking and supporting some of the programming, we just may find ourselves in a position of having to consider letting some things go by the wayside, and that would just be a shame.

Although volunteering is not a requirement of membership, I urge all members who can make the time, even for just one hour at an event you consider attending, to try volunteering. Within our organization, it is as much a social experience as any event you may attend. It is not only the people who undertake major roles, but it is the many volunteers who have but a few days or just a few hours a year that we would not be able to exist without.

I urge, and beseech, all members to take a look at the current List of Responsibilities on the OCWS website under “About – Our Organization.”  It’s mind boggling just how much goes into running the business of the organization, two wine competitions, wine auctions, The Courtyard at the OC Fair, all the while maintaining our level of educational and social programming throughout the year which, again, is done solely by volunteers.

If you see anything of interest to you, please reach out to me or any of the Chairs listed to inquire about helping just a bit.

In closing, I again, as in the past, quote John F. Kennedy when he said: “Every person can make a difference, and every person should try.”  Thank you.

– Fran Gitsham, President

August 2022 Gold Medal Mini-Tasting Recap

The August Gold Medal Mini-Tasting featured five different varietals, two wines each. All ten wines were Double Gold winners in the 2022 Commercial Wine Competition. There were ten  host sites and 155 members and guests spread throughout the county.

The first flight was a Viognier and a Viognier/Grenache Blanc/Roussanne blend. The second was a pair of Barbaras, followed by a pair of Syrahs, two Zinfandels, and a pair of Cabernet Sauvignons. One of the Zinfandels (Macchia’s Mischevious) was awarded Best in Class.

This group tends to favor red wines, and each of the eight red wines were selected as a top three wine at one or more of the sites.

The four favorite wines across the ten host sites:

Place Wine & Winery Year Price DESCRIPTION
1st Macchia Mischevious

Old Vine Zinfandel,

Lodi

Best of Class

95 pt. Double Gold

Top 3 at 8 of 10 sites

2020 $23 This Mischievous blend uses multiple Old Vine Zinfandel vineyards that when combined, produce the classic, fruit-forward characteristics that are the centerpiece of all great Lodi wines. Just a touch of Petite Sirah adds structure, as well as, increasing its complexity. Aging in small oak barrels creates a soft vanilla finish making it a very food-friendly wine that can be enjoyed daily with everything from rich pasta to a juicy barbecued steak.
2nd Macchia Infamous

Barbera

Amador County AVA

Lodi

95 pt. Double Gold

Top 3 at 6 of 10 sites

2020 $28 Barbera arrived in California along with the early Italian immigrants. It is celebrated around the world as an extremely food-friendly wine with refined tannins and lively acidity. At Macchia, 100% of our Barbera is aged in oak barrels for increased complexity which serves to highlight the vibrant red fruit and what makes Amador Barbera grapes famous. The Infamous head-trained Cooper Vineyard yields grapes with intense fruit, deep color, and soft tannin levels.
3rd Volatus G-LOC

Zinfandel

Willow Creek AVA

Paso Robles

93 pt. Double Gold

Top 3 at 5 of 10 sites

2020 $42 100% Zinfandel from the Willow Creek District. This is the biggest, baddest, most balanced Paso Zin you can find. Back Label: The pain cave of High G, WVR combat is a cruel mistress, but you have to learn to love her.

Alcohol 16.60%

4th J. Lohr Hilltop

Cabernet Sauvignon

Paso Robles

94 pt. Double Gold

Top 3 at 4 of 10 sites

2020 $29.99 The 2020 J. Lohr Hilltop Cabernet Sauvignon displays trademark aromas of blackberry, black currant, and toasted pastry crust. Dense and soft on the palate. Elegant layers of black and red currants leave a bright finish, accented by spice and pastry notes from extended oak aging.

Blend: 91% Cabernet Sauvignon, 4% Petit Verdot, 3% Malbec, 2% Cabernet Franc

In addition, attendees brought a delicious dish to share and then voted on a Chef of the Evening. The results of the Chef of the Evening at each host site are:

Hosts Rob and Germaine Romano: Bill Forsch – Beef Brisket

Host Bob Topham and Beverly Genis: Mark Godleski – Salmon

Hosts Don and Elee Phillips: Carolyn & Damian Christian – Smoked Pork

Hosts Craig and Ronna Rowe:  Marybeth Ackerman – Mushroom Dip

Hosts Betty Jo and Jay Newell: Rod White – Asparagus Soup

Hosts Pam and Bill Oneida: Linda Crawford – Meatballs with Cranberry Sauce

Hosts Marcia and James Vaughan: Cathy Painter – Nanaimo (Coconut Bars)

Hosts Fred and Cheryl Heinecke: Cheryl Heinecke – Bananas Foster

Hosts Dave and Barb White: Donna Hisey – Pulled Pork Sliders

Hosts John Molina and Courtney: Ed and Kim Meier – Baked Ziti

Congratulations to all the winners!  A big Thank You to the Hosts! Please send your recipes to George Cravens at George@ocws.org for possible publication on the website.

– George Cravens, Mini-Tasting Event Chair

Volunteers that Made a Difference

The OCWS relies on our volunteers for everything from guiding and managing our organization, to planning and running our events. Most volunteer work is done “behind the scenes” and unnoticed by many.

In recognition of their hours of service, the Wine Society rewards its volunteers with gift certificates redeemable for admission to OCWS events. Thank you to the following volunteers for their efforts during the 2021-2022 Board year.

Our volunteers make this the successful organization that it is. We encourage you to get involved. It is a great way to see how the OCWS works and meet new friends.

THANK YOU!  We couldn’t exist without our volunteers!

Some statistics: 343 members volunteered this year, and put in a total of over 19,200 hours. Note: The volunteer coupons will be good for future events through October 1, 2023.

Coupons cannot be used on merchandise or membership renewals. The coupons should show up in your account by the end of September.

– George Cravens, Volunteer Coordinator

$50 Discount Coupon

Dawn Bergen-Iglesias

Leslie Brown

Chris & Hank Bruce

Pam Carter

Judy Chapel

Ms. Courtney

Damian Christian

Kim & Sam Clark

Liz & Lloyd Corbett

Kevin Coy

Lynda Edwards

Wendy Eld

Sue England

George Euan

Linda Flemins

Ellen Flynn

Bill Forsch

Carol Frank & Sam Puzzo

Jane Goodnight

Larry Graham

Greg Hagadorn

Scott Harral

Cheryl Heinecke

Leslie Hodowanec

Helga Hrowal

Michael Iglesias

Michael Johnson

Virginia & Karl Kawai

Cheryl & Ken Knapp

Theresa & John Lane

Kevin Lite

Betty Jo & Jay Newell

Marcy Ott

Cathy & Lee Painter

Alice Polser

Bruce Powers

Rochelle Randel

Carolyn & Bill Redding

Walter Reiss

Ed Reyes

Janet Riordan

Greg Risling

Rob Romano

Craig Rowe

Karen Russell

Scott Sayre

Peter Schlundt-Bodien

Jack & Linda Shepard

Dave & Tami Stancil

Robyn & Dean Strom

Wendy & Stacey Taylor

Tom Tippett

Bob Topham

Richard Ward

Barb & Dave White

Sara Yeoman

$25 Discount Coupon

Martin Ageson

April Allison

Dino Amico

Greg Basile

Laura Brown

Eva Cheung

Adrienne & Ray Davis

Dan Donati

Stephen Edwards

Sharon & Yale Finkle

Kathy & Claude Fusaro

Beverly Genis

Mark Godleski

Kay Gooding

Kelly Haggard

Lorraine Hammonds

Donna Hisey

Will Holsinger

Lynelle Hustrulid

Shelly Jayne

Cathy & Mike MacKenzie

Sue McDonald

John Molina

Mary Mulcahey

Kathryn Nalty

George Ott

Mike Paz

Craig Peterson

Don & Elee Phillips

Laurie Preus

Debbie Renne

Deborah Reynolds

Stephanie Richards

Ronna Rowe

Denise Scott

Shelly Trainor

Gerard & Nancy Unterreiner

Jean Vetri-Wilson

Daniel Vlahovic

Dave Wieczorek

Tony Wiegand

Jolen Zeroski

$10 Discount Coupon

Shilo & Ray Bartlett

Christine Brady

James Burk

Anna & Thomas Christie

Shelley & Louis Cohen

Art Cordts

Maria Coy

Dennis & Gloria DeRosia

Nancy Edwards

Charles & Kate English

Tina & B.J. Fornadley

Ellen & Jack Gaar

Allison Godleski

John Goodnight

Scott Green

Kim & Gerry Guerin

Robert Hall

Patty Hansen

Laurie & James Johnson

CL Keedy

Michael Koval

Kathy Krieger

Shannon Logsdon

Mary Ellen & Carl Manning

Monica McCarthy

Robin McCormick

John Nation

Pam Oneida

Alison Painter

Maia Pehrson

Dorthy Pemberton

Eric Perez

Lisa & Tom Peterson

Ken Polser

Jane Ptucha

Roger Reiss

Tom Richey

Jean Rico

Cathy Risling

Kim & Steven Rizzuto

Manny Robledo

Wilton Roddy

Terry Rose

David Rutledge

Irene & Ken Scott

Irene & Raul Serna

Lori Shapiro

Yolanda Shelton

Scott Shuster

Elizabeth & Craig Stark

Jody & Mike Theissen

Evelyn & Darwin Thompson

Nicole Tormey

Deborah & Michael Webber

Spencer Wilson

Amie Zeroski